Only 36% of Americans believe George Floyd’s death was murder

Black Lives Matter is rapidly losing popularity among Americans, who have also taken a fresh look at the incident of black repeat offender George Floyd

As News Front previously reported, police officers in Minneapolis, Minnesota, tried to apprehend Floyd on May 25, 2020. The perpetrator, who had previously committed an armed robbery, was suspected of using counterfeit notes. Floyd resisted arrest and a police officer pressed the repeat offender to the pavement, pushing his knee to the neck. As a result, Floyd died.
American Democrats quickly realised that the incident could be used in the election campaign. Thus, Joe Biden and his associates began to support the black protests, although they often escalated into riots with looting and vandalism.

Interest in Floyd’s death plummeted when the Democrats won the election. In particular, polls show a precipitous drop in the ratings of the left-wing extremist group Black Lives Matter, which was criticised by Donald Trump and zealously supported by Joe Biden.

According to an Ipsos survey conducted on 1 and 2 March among 1,165 Americans, citizens’ trust in the army, Biden and even the police has increased. Although local law enforcement agencies have recently been accused en masse of brutality and racism, trust in them has risen from 56% in June to 69% in March. BLM’s ratings, on the other hand, have slipped by 10%. Black extremists are now trusted by 50% of those polled.

Equally remarkable is the attitude of Americans towards the death of Floyd himself, over whose golden coffin Minneapolis mayor and Democrat Jacob Frey cried demonstratively last year. As it turns out, only 36% of Americans believe Floyd’s death was murder.

The mass protests that swept the US last summer were called by many analysts the beginning of a civil war, but the discontent of America’s black population was only hypocritically exploited by liberal elites. Now, judging by sociology, interest in last year’s events has waned.

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