WP: The US National Guard has formed a Rapid Response Unit

According to the newspaper, the unit was formed in September and was originally intended for natural disaster response.
The U.S. National Guard has formed a unit, which consists of military police officers and can be used to intervene in the event of disturbances following the country’s planned general elections on November 3. 

This was reported by The Washington Post.

The unit, according to The Washington Post, was formed back in September and was originally designed to respond to natural disasters. At the time, it was intended to be a “rapid response force”. However, the name was later “softened” and changed to “regional response unit”, the newspaper explains. According to the newspaper source, this was done because the “new name more accurately describes the unit’s tasks”. It has a total of about 600 troops deployed in Alabama and Arizona. The Washington Post stresses that due to its small size, the unit will be used for operational reinforcement in the field within 24 hours in the event of disturbances.

 

Units of the US National Guard are stationed in each state, reporting to the governors and the president. The National Guard is an organized reserve of the U.S. Army and Air Force, which can be used in emergency situations such as natural disasters and law enforcement. By decision of the US President, the National Guard can also be used to support the armed forces, including outside the country. Since the beginning of the pandemic, thousands of members of the National Guard have been involved in various activities to combat the spread of the new coronavirus.

Mass protests and riots began in many US cities in late May after the death of African American George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Police used a suffocating seizure to arrest him. All four police officers involved in the operation were dismissed and charged. The U.S. National Guard joined local law enforcement agencies to bring order. Curfews were imposed in about 40 cities, including Washington and New York.

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