Merkel: the EU is seeking to enter into a trade deal with the UK, but not at any price

The German Chancellor said that the EU would like to see a fair agreement that takes into account mutual interests.

Merkel: the EU is seeking to enter into a trade deal with the UK, but not at any priceMerkel: the EU is seeking to enter into a trade deal with the UK, but not at any price

 The EU would like to achieve a trade deal with the United Kingdom, but it must be a fair agreement that takes into account mutual interests. This was announced on Thursday by German Chancellor Angela Merkel upon arrival at the EU Summit of Heads of State and Government.

“We will discuss UK’s exit from the EU and reaffirm our common position. We want to reach an agreement, but certainly not at all costs”, – said the German Prime Minister. – “But it has to be a fair agreement from which both parties would benefit”, –  added Merkel.

According to her, Germany supports the efforts of Michel Barnier, EU chief negotiator for Brexit, and Ursula von der Leyen, head of the European Commission, to reach a deal with the UK.

Following the EU summit to be held on 15-16 October, EU leaders were expected to approve a free trade agreement between the EU and the UK, which was to enter into force on 1 January 2021 – after the end of the transition period for Brexit. However, the text of the agreement has not yet been prepared and the entire negotiation process between Brussels and London is in fact at an impasse. Both sides are increasingly preparing for the UK’s final exit from the EU without a trade agreement and the transition to trade across the Channel under World Trade Organisation (WTO) rules – using quotas and tariffs, which could have a negative impact on their economies.

The main problem in the negotiations remains the issue of the border between the Republic of Ireland, which is a member of the EU and remains part of the community, and Northern Ireland, which is withdrawing from the EU as part of the United Kingdom. The UK’s exit agreement contains a clause that the border should remain open to people, goods and services, but no specific mechanism has been prescribed. As a result, London fears that by implementing the agreement with the EU it will lose economic sovereignty over part of its territory. The distribution of fishing quotas after Brexit remains another problematic issue.

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