South Korea canceled a joint naval exercise with Japan security services

Joint exercises of Japan and South Korea were canceled at the initiative of the South Korean side, the NHK television channel reported with reference to the 8th department of the national maritime security service.


On November 20, the South Korean side informed their Japanese counterparts that they would not be able to take part in events whose purpose was to work out joint actions in emergency situations. The exercises were to be held on November 27.

The cancellation of the exercises took place against the backdrop of another crisis in Japanese-Korean relations. At midnight, the Intelligence Exchange Agreement (GSOMIA) expires, which Seoul refused to roll over due to Japan imposing export restrictions on South Korea. In July, Japan restricted the export to South Korea of ​​the three materials necessary for the production of electronics, and in August excluded South Korea from the list of countries that are granted the most-favored-nation treatment in foreign trade.

Formally, Japan explained its actions by saying that South Korea could provide dual-use goods to North Korea. At the same time, this measure followed the decision of a South Korean court on the need to pay compensation by Nihon Steel, Fujikoshi Corporation and Mitsui Havy Industries for Korean forced labor in Japanese factories during World War II. Japan believes that it has already paid all the compensation.

In 1965, Japan paid Korea $ 500 million in compensation for damage caused during the war, hoping that in this way all the contradictions would be resolved, and the South Korean government would send this money for personal compensation to the victims. However, this did not happen, the victims received almost nothing, and the government allocated funds for the development of the economy and infrastructure. The victims continue to pursue their goal in the courts, however, Japan believes that the plaintiff should not be Japanese enterprises, but the South Korean government.

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